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Trust in Doctors 2009

Annual Survey of Public Trust in Professions

Trust in Doctors 2009
This report presents the findings of a survey conducted by Ipsos MORI on behalf of the Royal College of Physicians (RCP). The main objective of this survey was: to examine the level of public trust in a variety of professions and types of people, including doctors. Ipsos MORI has been tracking the findings from this study over the last 26 years.

 

Methodology


The questions were placed on the Ipsos MORI Public Affairs Monitor (‘PAM’) – an omnibus study that asks a range of social questions of British adults. A nationally representative quota sample of 2,023 adults aged 15 and over was interviewed throughout Great Britain from 4-10 September 2009. Quotas were set within output areas by age, gender, work status and housing tenure; and the survey data were weighted by age within gender, social grade, region, rurality, work status, ethnicity and deprivation. Interviews were conducted face-to-face in respondents’ homes, using CAPI.

Reporting


The figures quoted in the charts are percentages, and the base size from which the percentage is derived is indicated at the foot of the chart. Please note that the percentage figures for the various sub-samples or groups need to differ by a certain number of percentage points for the difference to be statistically significant. The number will depend on the size of the sub-group
sample and the percentage finding itself. There is further explanation in the section entitled “Statistical Reliability” in the Appendices to this report.

When an asterisk (*) appears in charts, this indicates a percentage of less than half, but greater than zero. Where percentages do not add up to 100% this can be due to a variety of factors – such as the exclusion of ‘Don’t know’ or ‘Other’ responses, multiple responses or computer rounding.
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