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Ipsos MORI Research Archive

Ipsos MORI is one of the leading political, social and business research companies in the UK and Ireland. We produce a huge volume of surveys and research, working with hundreds of clients across the public and private sectors.  Our polls consist of tracking data from our research on a wide variety of subjects, including education, healthcare, crime, the monarchy, race, business and politics. Our survey data encapsulates the views, experiences and behaviours of the general public and specific audiences.  Our long term political and social trends, collected over the last 30+ years, are unrivalled amongst polling organisations.

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Animal Experimentation Study 9 September 2009 This Ipsos MORI study carried out on behalf of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) is the sixth in a series examining trends in public attitudes towards the use of animals in research. Animal Experimentation Study
Animals In Medicine And Science 26 May 2000 Animal experiments — how do people form their opinions? Animals In Medicine And Science
Attitudes Towards Experimentation on Live Animals 19 May 1999 What would it take for you to agree that a mouse or monkey should suffer pain or even die? To cure a life-threatening disease? Or would no scientific gain justify the animal's suffering? Attitudes Towards Experimentation on Live Animals
Attitudes Towards Experimentation on Live Animals - Toplines 19 May 1999 Q1.a On balance, do you agree or disagree that scientists should be allowed to conduct any experiments on live animals? Base: All Version 1 (949: split-sample) Attitudes Towards Experimentation on Live Animals - Toplines
Ipsos MORI / DTI Animal Experimentation Study, December 2006 30 May 2007 Ipsos MORI has conducted a survey on the general public's views on animal experimentation, on behalf of the Department of Trade and Industry. The study is the fourth in a series examining trends in public attitudes towards the use of animals in research. The first study from which trends have been examined was carried out on behalf of the Medical Research Council (in June-September 1999), with the second and third such studies being on behalf of CMP, the Coalition for Medical Progress (in 2002 and 2005). In March 1999, MORI carried out a study examining public attitudes to animal experimentation generally, and experiments involving mice or monkeys, causing no pain, severe pain, or death [see notes]. Ipsos MORI / DTI Animal Experimentation Study, December 2006
MORI 'Use Of Animals In Medical Research' Survey 2005 2 December 2005 Findings of a MORI research study on behalf of the Coalition for Medical Progress (CMP) show that 75% of the GB population can accept animal experimentation so long as it is for medical purposes. A similar proportion (76%) can accept animal experimentation as long as there is no unnecessary suffering to the animals. 72% of adults agree with animal experimentation for all types of medical research where there is no alternative, and 53% can accept animal research only for life-threatening diseases. 89% of those surveyed agreed with one or more of these four statements. MORI 'Use Of Animals In Medical Research' Survey 2005
The Use Of Animals In Medical Research 19 June 2003 The Coalition for Medical Progress commissioned MORI to ask British people what they thought about the use of animals in medical research. The Use Of Animals In Medical Research
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